#30 – Coco (tunisian crochet pattern)

Baby sweater tunisian crochet pattern.

I want to crochet this!

I decided to go ahead and venture into the world of tunisian crochet patterns, hence this cute little jacket. I originally had something very different in mind (something I’m still going to follow through on) but when I got going on this sweater it looked too much like a little Chanel jacket not to roll with that scheme instead–especially since Tunisian Simple Stitch has a woven texture. It really came out too thick for my original intention anyway. The Tunisian stitch definitely creates a very, er, sturdy fabric. Particularly when done with chunky, acrylic yarn. That is why I would definitely classify this as more of a “jacket” than a “sweater.” It’s not like cardboard or anything, but it’s certainly very structured.

Baby sweater tunisian crochet pattern.

If you’ve never done Tunisian Crochet before, here and here are good places to get the low down. It’s super easy to do. The biggest trick is remembering how to work the first few stitches on the return pass and to count the first loop at the beginning of the row as a stitch. Once you’ve got that straightened out, though, it’s a piece of cake. I might even go so far as to say it’s easier than regular crochet.

Baby sweater tunisian crochet pattern.

 I made little faux pockets by just creating the flaps, as I don’t really think babies have a strong need for real pockets. But if you’re into pockets, it would be very easy to just crochet up a few squares and sew them on the front. The grid pattern created by the Tunisian Simple Stitch would make it very easy to place them straight, and you could even count how many stitches wide and tall you need to make them the right size.

Baby sweater tunisian crochet pattern.

Being that this was my first venture into Tunisian pattern writing, it was a little nerve-wracking trying to figure out how to word it because the technique is just a little different than both knitting and crochet. I think I got it figured out in a pretty straight forward and easy to understand way, but as always, I’m here to answer any questions you might have along the way. I’m very happy I gave it a shot because now I’m pretty hooked on Tunisian (no pun intended.) I really like the fabric it creates, the little squares are pretty nifty looking. There are a lot of ideas I have for how to utilize the texture of the fabric in the future (hint: embrooooidery)

Baby sweater tunisian crochet pattern.

I also look forward to working with Tunisian knit stitch. I feel like it definitely has it’s own place, because the fabric created with Tunisian knit stitch is quite a bit thicker than actual knitting, and therefore potentially a little less versatile overall. But there’s still plenty of ideas to explore, plus there’s plenty of crocheters out there who have no interest in learning how to knit (maybe you’re one of em?) but who might like the texture of knitting. Also, since I’m trying to keep the crochet-to-knit pattern ratio roughly even, having more ways to utilize crochet in ways that I actually like the look of is a very good thing.

Baby sweater tunisian crochet pattern.

As far as how this sweater is constructed: the body is all done in one piece, the sleeves are done separately and they’re sewn on. The sleeves are crochet flat and seamed too, but here’s another thing I really like about Tunisian: seaming it is like a dream. It’s seriously the easiest time I’ve had seaming something knit or crocheted, ever. The way the stitches are constructed (at least for Tunisian Simple Stitch) make it so easy to see where you should stick your needle, and it comes together so nicely. Easier than sewing knits, and by far easier than sewing regular crochet.
Baby sweater tunisian crochet pattern.

I hope you enjoy this little jacket pattern :)

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1 Comment

  1. This little sweater looks so simple yet so pretty! What a clean design. I love it!

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